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Zephyzu
March 14th, 2018, 12:00 am
so whenever we focus on something both eyes focus on a single point, so we're always a little bit cross eyed if we're looking at something right? which all makes sense, but what about when you're looking at a star? That's like, really far away, so are our eyes just like almost completely straight out looking at something billions and billions of miles away? Seriously, the nearets star is 4.2 LIGHT YEARS away from us! You can't tell me we're actually triangulating the position of something 4.2 light years away with our eyes. But even then, if that were true, why aren't the stars further away blurry, or the moon double-imaged like normal when you focus on something and there are other things in the foreground and background? Every celestial body just a non-blurry white dot in the sky. So we can't actually be looking at the stars themselves, right? But if not then what is the light hitting that makes it visible? Is our atmosphere acting like a signal repeater for light outside the atmosphere? That would make sense with the distances being non distinct and why the sky looks two dimensional, but I've never heard of that before. If our eyes are actually recieving light from 4.2 light years away, then that means you could map out the actual location of every star in three dimensional space, by yourself, because you already have two points to work off of!

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Elex

· March 14th, 2018, 12:21 am
p sure you would need more than 2 points because not all stars are the same size or brightness
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HeartOfTheStorm

· March 14th, 2018, 2:26 pm
Everything that your brain tells you is approximations. Can you guess how large a cloud is? The effectiveness of our two-eye depth perception (stereopsis) stops being effective at a certain length which I haven't found, though there are many other methods of depth perception even with only one eye.

For the blurriness question: the farther out the focus is, the wider the focus becomes (depth of field gets wider or "deeper"). Your eye aperture also automatically adjusts depth of field. You can get a shallow depth of field (objects around focus are blurry) at long range with a larger focal length lense. Your eyes are a fixed focal length. Research it if you're interested.
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Inzei

· March 14th, 2018, 4:25 pm
i'd like to explain your very deep problem using math and estimated numbers... but i suck at math and numbers >.>
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Zephyzu

· March 14th, 2018, 8:45 pm
I still think it's insane, thanks for the science tho
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